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30Apr 2017


Villa Veth is an abstract villa in forest designed by 123DV in 2011, covers an area of 480 m² and is located in The Netherlands.

Villa Veth is a modern, customized villa, a private residence for a family of four. It is situated on a large parcel of land by a forest in the eastern part of the Netherlands.
The driveway on the entrance side leads to a carport situated below the house. This places the cars out of sight and gives the impression of the house partially hovering. It is a simple architectural approach with a great visual effect. The house looks sleek and abstract on the outside, but has a warm and cozy interior.
The ground floor and principal living area of the two-storey residence is divided into two. On one side are the master bedroom and two kids’ bedrooms plus two small studios. The other half of the floor plan is taken up by an open-concept living area that includes the kitchen, dining and living spaces. The furniture in the living room is all custom designed. The kitchen, storage space, fireplace, piano and audio equipment form an integral part of the wall unit.
The living area of this bungalow with woodland is orientated towards the south. The curved glass wall enclosing the living area towards the spacious terrace is designed to visually minimize the boundary between inside and outside. From the inside of the house this provides a maximum experience of its surroundings. Supported with a single column clad with reflective metal, the low-profile roof extends to cover an outdoor patio. The large canopy and floor heating allow inhabitants to enjoy the terrace during cool autumn days.
Photography by Christiaan de Bruijne

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30Apr 2017


Boggestranda / Rever & Drage

Boggestranda / Rever & Drage, © Tom Auger

© Tom Auger


© Tom Auger


© Tom Auger


© Tom Auger


© Tom Auger




+15


  • Architects

  • Location

  • Architect in Charge

    Tom Auger, Martin Beverfjord, Eirik Lilledrang

  • Area

    42.0 m2

  • Project Year

    2016

  • Photographs

© Tom Auger

© Tom Auger

Floor Plan

Floor Plan

From the architect. The conversion has been made in order to change an old building with a simple cellar and ten very small rooms to a functional cabin. The owners wanted to retain the traditional and representative facade towards the road and other settlement in the village, however, they wished a more open aspect towards the fjord and mountains. The original building comprised a mix of building materials and included both vertical and horizontal panelling. A large glass panel has now been included in the south-east wall, such that the new kitchen has a completely open aspect to the views in this direction. The south and east facades were previously a collage of materials and colors which the new glass panel is now a part of.

© Tom Auger

© Tom Auger

The top of the glass panel extends up past an existing low paneled wall in the loft, such that the woodwork absorbs warmth and sun-rays penetrate between the panels.

Section

Section

A new low window has also been mounted in the bedroom to allow views when lying in bed. When standing the view is of the grass fields outside. Internally only the bedroom has been preserved, whilst the majority of the remaining internal walls have been removed, such that the loft and ground floor have been combined to make one airy space. A tiled area with underfloor heating has been included in the floor to allow for drying of wet shoes. A new wind membrane has been include in the walls in order to reduce heat loss. A wooden roof has been placed over the existing corrugated iron roof.

© Tom Auger

© Tom Auger

The result has been better than our expectations. The harmony in the east (south-east??) facade works well in spite of the different windows. The choice and composition of materials and color functions well.

Towards the west the original facade has been preserved but includes a simple, covered shelter such that equipment and clothing can be kept dry and one achieves an extra outside room.

© Tom Auger

© Tom Auger

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30Apr 2017


originally built in 1982, clou architects repurpose and transform this industrial boiler room into a public gallery in taiyuan, china. in 2016, the building was stripped of its original structure and was finally converted into a showroom by the widely acclaimed architecture firm. additionally, the 2000 sqm building includes a library, reading room, conference centre and a café, making it a target for all audiences.


the cube’s main entrance at dawn

previously dark and cavernous, clou architects open up the structure of the boiler room using a combination of transparent and translucent glass brick in order for the building to harbor light. the opacity of the glass walls changes gradually throughout the day depending on the position of the sun, while at night, strong LEDs light up the walls creating a red lantern effect.


the cube consists of translucent and transparent glass bricks

the black and white columns embellish the structure and provide the spatial framework for the main hall. to create a bright and airy ambience, the architects use white terrazzo flooring, venetian plasters walls, chrome light boxes and ceilings with barrisol surfaces. the white finishes amplify the natural daylight that is radiated throughout the façade.


glass brick façade changes its level of opacity throughout the day


illuminated glass brick facade during the night


the interior space of the main entrance


the spacious exhibition area with the marble columns


the library and reading room


the washroom area


a mirrored corridor with the glowing barrisol ceiling


the building being stripped down to its original structure


plans of the original boiler room

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

edited by: lynn chaya | designboom

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30Apr 2017


The bejeweled handbag designer Judith Leiber is synonymous with American glitz and glamour. Although her eponymous accessory label dates back to 1963, Leiber’s whimsical and intricately adorned bags still continue to be a fixture at glamorous evening events – even long after she created her final design in 2004.

The Hungarian-born designer’s legacy is currently in the spotlight, along with one hundred of her glittering creations, at the Museum of Art and Design in New York (MAD). The exhibition, ‘Judith Leiber: Crafting a New York Story’, also features wax models, letters, photographs and additional ephemera that charts the rise of the visionary, from her beginnings as a patternmaker and Holocaust survivor to the celebrated female entrepreneur she is remembered as today.

Grouse minaudière with rhinestones, 1980. Photography: Gary Mamay. Courtesy of the Leiber Collection

While Leiber is best known for her sparkling Swarovski crystal-encrusted pieces, the exhibition also highlights exquisitely crafted leather and textile bags, which showcase a different side of her craftsmanship abilities. Up close, visitors will also be able to spot art deco and art-inspired references in the bags’ hardware and design. Whether it’s a Sonia Delaunay-inspired envelope clutch in different skins from 1990, or her more fantastical minaudières taking the shape of a bunch of asparagus, an aubergine or an Emperor penguin, this detailed presentation promises to illuminate even Leiber’s most ardent fans.

‘Judith Leiber’s combination of craftsmanship and innovation sets her work apart from other handbag designers in both the United States and Europe during the twentieth century, a legacy that continues,’ says the exhibition’s curator Samantha De Tillio. ‘But beyond the handbags, her personal story speaks to so many. She was an immigrant who created a flourishing business – a story that has political and social relevance, especially today.’

JEWELLERY, NEW YORK DESIGN, NEW YORK EXHIBITIONS

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30Apr 2017


retaW store Harajuku / The Archetype

retaW store Harajuku  / The Archetype, © SHIMIZU KEN

© SHIMIZU KEN


© SHIMIZU KEN


© SHIMIZU KEN


© SHIMIZU KEN


© SHIMIZU KEN




+9


  • Architects

  • Location

  • Architect in Charge

    Nobuo Araki

  • Area

    26.35 m2

  • Project Year

    2016

  • Photographs

© SHIMIZU KEN

© SHIMIZU KEN

From the architect. As retaW’s first street level store, retaW store Harajuku functions as a showcase for the fragrance brand.

The space is comprised of three elements (sections) with distinctive functions: “By Product,” “By Fragrance” and “Backspace.”

© SHIMIZU KEN

© SHIMIZU KEN

Floor Plan

Floor Plan

“By Product” is used to display and introduce the brand’s full range of products. Featuring display cases of products arranged by category, the section resembles a convenience store, a space designed in a straightforward manner based on its purpose and function. The section also embodies a distinctively Japanese or Tokyo-like style.

© SHIMIZU KEN

© SHIMIZU KEN

“By Fragrance” is the section in which customers can experience the brand’s various fragrances. The space incorporates a gently curved surface in order to provide customers with an emotive experience as they sample the fragrances. Referencing the brand’s name, an inversion of the word “water,” tiles were used for the displays and convey the atmosphere of a domestic space.

© SHIMIZU KEN

© SHIMIZU KEN

“Backspace” is located at the rear of the space. Finished with predominantly wooden materials, the section expresses the warmth of an everyday living space

In order for these three distinctively different elements (sections) to be constructed in harmony, the utmost care was taken to balance materials, use unexpected elements, refine section details and colors, use natural light and develop an interior lighting plan. The space was constructed in a way that resembles adding layers to a meticulous creation.

© SHIMIZU KEN

© SHIMIZU KEN

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30Apr 2017


Immerse Yourself in Architectural Spaces Worldwide With the NYT’s Daily 360

Immerse Yourself in Architectural Spaces Worldwide With the NYT's Daily 360, via The New York Times Daily 360

via The New York Times Daily 360

With 360 camera technology, the ability to transport people into a space through film has become all the more immersive. Viewers are able to turn the viewport in every direction to see the whole scene, or even to put on a headset for a more natural way of viewing a scene. Of course, this has important implications for viewing architecture, which many believe has become too image based, and therefore two-dimensional. 360 videos leave no corners conveniently hidden, as a traditional video or image would, perhaps providing a fuller picture of a place – could this perhaps open up a more human-scale understanding of space?

The New York Times have treated their Facebook followers to some great architectural insights through their Daily 360, getting more than their money’s worth out of their 360 camera equipment. Some of these must-see videos include a dance rehearsal taking place in the Guggenheim Museum’s rotunda, as well as an aerial view of La Paz, Bolivia. Read on to take a peek into the richness of earth’s urban spaces:

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30Apr 2017


semana, one of colombia’s most popular magazines, honors the thousands of victims affected by landmines in its recent typography campaign, ‘help font ‘. according to the publication, the problem has never received the attention it deserves from the government or the media, making most people unaware of the gravity of the situation.

help font
video © nicolás cortés

using the power of art to elicit change, semana magazine’s typography essentially incorporates the movement of prosthetic limbs in its font. the typeface is featured in a special issue where the headlines and logos are written using ‘help font’ including stories, maps, statistics and broad editorial content on landmines in colombia.


the typography pays homage the landmine victims of colombia


a landmine survivor holding an image of the typeface


the font is featured in a special issue of semana magazine


the issue which carries the magazine’s typefont


a physical wooden prototype of the typeface


the characters written in ‘help font’

designboom has received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘ feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

edited by: lynn chaya | designboom

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30Apr 2017


Wisdom, wit and the right amount of weirdness are three things that come naturally to moustacheod artist Gavin Turk. The original YBA is known for his radical approach to contemporary sculpture, his vocal politics, and his talent for mimicry – in the halcyon days of the early 90s he impersonated everyone from punks to Pollock.

It’s unsurprising then, that Turk finds himself friendly with similarly avant-guard creative minds. Enter experimemtal theatre director Patrick Eakin Young. Known for his contemporary operas – sometimes harrowing, othertimes hilarious – Eakin Young heads up London-based theatre company Erratica. The likely duo were ‘pushed together by friends’ back in 2014, when they joined forces on a three-part production, Triptych, to great critical acclaim. Turk’s ‘exhibition-like’ set comprised theatrical recreations of his renowned trompe-l’oeil works, which doubled as props for the actors.

During a rehearsal of Eakin Yong’s upcoming production Remnants, the two artmakers – and friends – met for a catch-up to a backdrop of rhapsodic opera singers and metronomic sound engineers.

Patrick Eakin Young: What are you currently working on?

Gavin Turk: I just got back from an opening in Amsterdam’s Museum Van Loon where I have created a whole exhibition based around tulips, particularly Turkish tulips. As well as my own pieces, there’s a portfolio of works by other artists in the show. After, the show will move to the Bowes Museum in County Durham this summer. Alongside this, we have just had a kind of ‘tulip baptism’ in London.

PEY: What on earth is a tulip baptism?

GT: As of this week, I will have my own species of tulip.

Gavin Turk with ‘Tulips’, 2017. Photography: Live Stock Market

PEY: What have you called it?

GT: Gavin Turkish. The flower farmers and the registrar initially vetoed the name, saying that there were too many tulips which were called Turk or Turkish. But when they realised my name was actually Gavin Turk, they couldn’t resist. So this week – at The Print Room in London – there was a theatrical baptism. We had a stage act, and an exhibition of my tulip portfolio. I understand you’re also taking to the stage at The Print Room later this year?

PEY: Yes, Remnants starts its run there in June. I began conceptualising the piece two years ago, workshopping ideas around women’s neurosis and ghost stories. During research, I found a memoir written in the early 2000s by Courtney Angela Brkic. It had in it everything I wanted to say. It’s about her family, the Bosnian war, and her migration to America. In the 90s, she went back to Bosnia to become a part of the forensics team that were digging up the graves of those killed during the war. I wondered, ‘Why did she go back? What was she looking for?’

GT: It sounds interesting – but also heavy, without much get out. When we worked together on Triptych back in 2014, it had a jolly act in the middle, a tragic one at the end and an intriguing, questioning one at the beginning. Each of these components must pull together.

PEY: It is a heavy subject, and Remnants is a dark piece. But there are lighter ideas running through – like the music, which is a combination of original voice and traditional folk. We use something called klapa – a kind of warm, coastal, barbershop quartet, with lush vocal harmonies. So there’s balance. I don’t want to destroy my audience, but I want to make them think.

PEY: In the memoir, Brkic talks a lot about the separate cultures of Bosnia, and how they started drawing lines between themselves in the early 90s. It’s funny, I started working on this project two years ago – since then we’ve gone through Brexit and Trump. It reminds us that fissures in society can be aggravated. After Brexit, biking around London’s East End, as a Canadian immigrant myself, I felt paranoid.

GT: The general consensus round here was that we were going to stay inside the European Union. It was strange to find out the result, and it’s a confused state that we are in. As an artist, I always thought it was my job to be confused. Artists articulate confusion. Now that everyone is confused, perhaps every one is an artist! I don’t know. Maybe that’s what works about creating art around difficult subjects at the moment. The audience can pitch it against their own life experience.


An early version of Remnants was performed last year at The Print Room in London, where it will return for a full run this June

PEY: Since working with you in 2014, I’ve been trying to render these ideas of confusion and disjointedness in each project I do. I want to surprise people with my contemporary, experimental genre of opera. After Triptych, I staged a production in the MET museum in New York, called La Celestina (2015). I like the interaction between artworks and my productions. For instance we’re making a concert performance of Remnants on Friday at the Marian Goodman gallery, in amongst Annette Messager’s exhibition on uteruses – which will probably be a perfect setting!

GT: Yes – it’s great when the set (whether immersive or otherwise) can become like an additional character. In the production we worked on together, I tried to create a set that acted as the fourth part of the triptych.

PEY: What I loved about your Tripytch set was its use of your own artistic practice. It featured your interest in copying or forgery. Your painted bronzes look so much like the real thing, but there’s something fake about them. Like with Bag – it almost looks like a real trash bag – but not quite. It’s like when you Google translate something over and over again, it shapeshifts and starts to tell its own story. That was kind of what I was trying to do with my theatre company – create something disjointed from opera in the traditional sense. Do you have plan to create a theatre set again?

GT: Nothing solid yet. Triptych was my first theatre commission, but you look into art history and find countless artists have worked on theatre sets. Think Dada and David Hockney. Picasso did a whole load of them. But generally it seems to be ‘make a large artwork’, and then the performance happens in front of it. Maybe that’s okay.

PEY: I’d like to create something where the art is the starting point, and allow the drama to flow from there.

PERFORMANCE ART, HEAD TO HEAD, LONDON EXHIBITIONS

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30Apr 2017


Independent, Community Lead Initiative Looks at “Leftunder” Infrastructure Land in Melbourne

Independent, Community Lead Initiative Looks at

Courtesy of LEFT UNDER

With Melbourne’s contentious elevated rail project starting construction, an independent group has taken the opportunity to critique the way that this key piece of infrastructure is engaging with the public. The project, leftunder, is a platform for alternate, community driven proposals for the public space being made available adjacent to this new infrastructure, that which might normally be overlooked and undermaintained. Run by not-for-profit OFFICE, the project has recently culminated in an exhibition at The National Gallery of Victoria’s Design Week.

Courtesy of LEFT UNDER

Courtesy of LEFT UNDER

The leftunder project is aimed at generating a conversation and proposals among community groups and local residents about how they could occupy the 22.5 HA of land being made available below the development of the Sky Rail in Melbourne’s south-eastern suburbs. This is not only a critique on current developer driven process in Melbourne and wider Australia but also an alternative to the current community engagement strategies.

Courtesy of LEFT UNDER

Courtesy of LEFT UNDER

The research has identified that there are 1200+ community groups within the suburbs adjacent to the development, all with a strong identity and skill set. The goal of leftunder is to look at how these vibrant communities that are often unseen can be expressed within this soon to be created public space. A number of engagement strategies have been undertaken, the two most prominent of which have been the launch of the leftunder website as an online forum for discussion, where residents submit proposals, these are then translated into axonometric diagrams for the wider community to engage with and comment on.

The second key strategy has been that of the series of information booth installations, culminating in an exhibition of this work as a part of National Gallery of Victoria Design Week.

Map of intervention suggestions from the NGV exhibition. Image Courtesy of LEFT UNDER

Map of intervention suggestions from the NGV exhibition. Image Courtesy of LEFT UNDER

The exhibition collated a series of nine installations at each of the nine proposed level crossings to be removed by the state government in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs, from Carnegie to Noble Park. The exhibition installation, in the form of an information booth, created a forum for participants, locals, and professionals to view and discuss a range of responses to the occupation of the 22.5 ha of land being created from the elevation of the train line. It highlighted the difference of demographics as the project passes through three councils and the values that these locals hold.


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER


Courtesy of LEFT UNDER




+25


News via: leftunder and OFFICE.

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