PROJECTS NEWSFEED

20Feb 2018


There is nothing quite as cozy and inviting as the clean lines and soft textures that are so common in the Scandinavian design style. By using soothing neutral tones alongside natural greenery and bare wood, the Scandinavian homes featured here are exude a calming warmth. Further, the furniture chosen in each is able to convey how important simplicity of style is to the designer. Embellishments and garish accessorizing is better left to other styles — the Scandinavian interior (no matter where its geographic location) is content only with harmony in its color palettes, flow, and overall livability.

Recommended Reading:
50 Inspirational Scandinavian Style Dining Rooms
50 Inspirational Scandinavian Style Living Rooms

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19Feb 2018



Chicago continues its impressive restaurant boom. But what is perhaps most impressive about this rash of new venues is how much space they’re offering diners. To wit: Bellmore, local hospitality group Boka’s latest, occupies a 6,000-square-foot sprawl in the West Loop, and every inch of it is dedicated to a manor house fantasy unlike anything else you’ll see in the Windy City.

Designed by local outfit Studio K, Bellemore is layered with so much texture that it never feels overwhelming. The central serving station, which is meant to mimic a traditional entry table, the Thoney and Bauhaus-inspired seating, and even the stuffed birds perched just above the marble bar evoke an old- world opulence. But the chevron column, the ‘millennial’ pink upholstery, and the strikingly dark owl-themed mural by artist Tracee Badway in the private dining room (which is outfitted with a glass bookcase that looks directly into the kitchen)  give the interiors plenty of contemporary flair. 

Similarly, chef Jimmy Papadopoulos’s menu seems like the kind of feast you would be served at a manor. Think indulgent caviar-topped oyster pies; dry aged duck glazed with honey; and a chestnut brioche dessert paired with poached pears. 

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19Feb 2018


The Compound designed by Javelin Block was a Multi RIBA award winning restoration project – a 10,000 sq. ft former textile factory converted into a multifunction creative space used by some of the leading players in the film, music and media industries. Features include bridges, balconies, mezzanine floors, a 25 seat cinema, speakeasy bar, art studio and three self-contained living spaces across multiple levels. Photography by Javelin Block.

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19Feb 2018


D’Entrecasteaux House / Room11 Architects

D’Entrecasteaux House / Room11 Architects, © Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking


© Ben Hosking


© Ben Hosking


© Ben Hosking


© Ben Hosking






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© Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking

Text description provided by the architects. Bruny Island sits across the narrow D’entrecasteaux Channel which separates it from the Tasmanian mainland. Accessible only by boat, Bruny is a remote and beautiful landscape. The island is a traditional holiday destination for Hobartions and is increasingly becoming an international destination for more discerning cool climate connoisseurs.  Our clients, a professional couple, approached us after purchasing the land with a view to building a permanent residence. With family members owing adjacent properties, our clients was intently aware of the need for the architecture to reconcile the need to orient for light and view, but also provide protection from offshore winds and glare from the expansive water plane. Replete with devastating panoramas, the site was nonetheless exposed.  Winds buffet the angled terrain and the glorious light is at times too demanding for the eyes.


© Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking

In parallel to this physical need for protection, the remote location brought a psychological need.  The home had to provide a reassuringly solid and contained presence, company for a remote and beautiful existence.  These two factors led to a dialogue about security, permanence and belonging. Tasmania is notable, in geological terms, for its Dolerite, which is around 180 million years old. Our clients are a family including two geologists and therefore stonework fitted well with our architectural inclinations and the families’ professional interests.


© Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking

The resulting high stone walled outer skin, and a light, taut, timber interior, contain the traditional functions of a home.  These contrasting built elements satisfy both the physical and psychological need that the location demands of the architecture. The modest house employs an inflected non-orthogonal plan where massive stone walls encompass light timber-lined living spaces.  The black stained timber interior provides relief from the blisteringly bright Tasmanian light and projects the occupant into the landscape beyond. Large sliding timber doors open to the northern light and a large deck which overlooks the channel and mountain range beyond. 


© Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking


Floor Plan
Floor Plan


© Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking

Service functions are wrapped up in shiny black boxes. The kitchen island bench sits as a crisp blunt monolith. Black bathrooms feature generous skylights and full height tiling. Full width mirrors double the perceived space of these carefully designed interior volumes. Bespoke glazing details are used throughout the residence. Double-glazed argon gas units provide thermal performance commiserate with the cool temperate climate. The house harvests rainwater and recycles wastewater onsite. D’Entrecasteaux House has a simple pallet, dark within a pale stone exterior.  The orientation of face-fixed bespoke glazing focuses attention upon specific elements of the landscape, providing an opportunity for repose.


© Ben Hosking
© Ben Hosking

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19Feb 2018


Window on the Lake / YH2, © Francis Pelletier
© Francis Pelletier


© Francis Pelletier


© Francis Pelletier


© Francis Pelletier


© Francis Pelletier






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  • Architects

  • Location

    Saint-Élie-de-Caxton, Canada
  • Design Team

    Karl Choquette, Marie-Claude Hamelin, Étienne Sédillot, Loukas Yiacouvakis,

  • Area

    140.0 m2

  • Project Year

    2017

  • Photographs


© Francis Pelletier
© Francis Pelletier

Text description provided by the architects. A window on the lake: the very essence of the cottage. A warm, simple wood dwelling open to nature and a peaceful lake.


© Francis Pelletier
© Francis Pelletier

The house stands on the site of an old family cottage, just steps away from the shores of Lac Plaisant in the Mauricie region. Thanks to its simplicity, restraint and refinement, the project embodies the architect’s attempt to capture the essence of cottage life – a wooden home designed for vacations and enabling true communion with nature.


Sections / Plan
Sections / Plan

Featuring wood construction inside and out, the house’s single large gable covers all living spaces.


© Francis Pelletier
© Francis Pelletier

Sited in a small clearing, its foundation invisible, the home is a pure, light volume resting on a grassy carpet.


Sections / Plan
Sections / Plan

Its architecture is restrained and its scale modest, in tune with the clearing and lake.

The exterior, both roof and walls, is clad entirely in white cedar boards.

Both of the building’s long sides feature three large, tall glass panels, allowing seamless transitions between interior and exterior spaces.


© Francis Pelletier
© Francis Pelletier

The south side is all glass, creating a direct link between the lake and the living spaces, arranged under a large double-height gable extending outward to cover a small porch.

The full transparency of the southern façade lets in ample sunlight in fall and winter, while the mature trees standing between house and lake moderate the summer sun and provide a high degree of privacy in boating season.


Sections / Plan
Sections / Plan

The balloon frame, with its exposed wooden studs and joists painted white, gives the building a unique rhythm of shadow and light.

The cottage has a relaxed character. It is a true family cottage that can sleep up to 12 in two ground-floor bedrooms and a large, open sleeping area on the second floor. 


© Francis Pelletier
© Francis Pelletier

This is the cottage as an expression of the art of living: a gentle, simple, pure way of life.

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19Feb 2018


Clement Blanchet Draws Inspiration from Circus Tents for Competition-Winning Cultural Center in France

Clement Blanchet Draws Inspiration from Circus Tents for Competition-Winning Cultural Center in France, Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture

Clément Blanchet Architecture has been selected as the winner of an international competition for the design of a new cultural center to be located in the Paris suburb of Gonesse, France, beating out proposals from Bernard Tschumi & Moreau Kusunoki.

Named Circus³, the facility features a unique tensile roof evocative of a circus pavilion, and will house a 1,500 seat theater for a variety of cultural performances and events.


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture






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Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture

This a unique performance venue to EuropaCity and the region, that will be designed specifically to host an internationally branded show, featuring advanced technical features,” explain the architects.


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture

CIRCUS ³ is focused around three principle design moves:

  1. Free the ground and let the landscape grow
  2. Raise an horizontal  scenographic  and flexible platform framing the main room
  3. Display the roof as a metaphor of the circus, a place for all activities.

The resulting design produces an urban effect that gestures toward the public plaza and becomes a new piece of “transparent infrastructure” where the public can gather and interact.


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture

“The contemporary circus is the demonstration of an historical synthesis and at the same time of a technological engagement,” the architects explain. “The superposition of programs and potentials improves the great entertainment but also maintains a collective memory of the classical typology.”

The central element of the building, the performance space, will use top-of-the-line technology to transform into a variety of configurations capable of housing shows of different types and sizes. 


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture

According to the architects, the show is greater than just what is being formed on stage, but must resonate throughout the entire design.

“The place is the show, is show; make the show, make the place.”


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture


Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture
Courtesy of Clement Blanchet Architecture

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18Feb 2018



The shine has barely worn off 2018, but it’s already proving to be a banner year for the Hong Kong-based designer André Fu. Fresh off his work on the new Andaz Singapore and a number of other high profile gigs already in the works, including the new Guo Fu Lou restaurant at the Murray Hong Kong, Fu has just unveiled the Pavilion Suites at The Berkeley.

Over the past couple of years, the London institution has undergone several significant facelifts – the most recent being a new entrance and extensions by Robert Angell and Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners – but Fu’s sparkling two additions to the hotel’s signature suites collection have been one of the most highly anticipated. 

And it’s not difficult to see why. 

Several fifth floor rooms facing Belgravia have been consolidated into two sprawling suites, each featuring a large terrace and glass house.

Dressed in soft gold fabric, tufted rugs, wood panels, a rock glass chandelier and Agnes Martin prints, the 2,300 sqft, two-bedroom Crescent Pavilion quietly channels a garden in the sky vibe, an effect reinforced by dainty landscaping on the terrace and views of St Paul’s Church.   

Down the hall, the two-bedroom Grand Pavilion is dressed in an Asia-lite blend of lacquer, green silk, hand-stitched wall panels, antique brass lights, and a hand-gilded glass screen. 

Meanwhile, in-room dining options are given a little lift with Marcus Waring’s kitchen and the hotel’s Blue Bar mixologist available on speed-dial.

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18Feb 2018


with minimalist yet delicately contrasting interiors that are flooded with natural daylight, norm architects has restored a historic villa in copenhagen, denmark. the original building, which is said to have been inhabited by renowned danish architect, designer and cultural critic, poul henningsen, was devastated by a fire in 2014. in spite of this, the modern home still references its past, with high panels, parquet flooring, paned windows, teak furniture and retro PH lamps.


all images courtesy of norm architects

 

 

the most significant change from the original design has seen the ground floor, which was once configured of small divided rooms, be transformed into one big living area. featuring norm architects’ bronzed brass handles for reform atop a light gray stone island, the minimalist kitchen is subtly separated to the living room by a large cabinet in dark stained oak. here, classic elements have been restored and elegantly combined with contemporary details, such as the contrast between the dark mid-century teak furniture and marble plinths.

 

 

with windows on all sides, the norm architects’ restoration follows a clean approach, where natural daylight floods the interior. the central staircase, which also helps to divide the kitchen and living area, actually creates a dynamic sense of openness. its floating steps of solid oak compose a flow between the basement, ground floor and top floor, with skylights placed above.

 

the house being a former home – or summerhouse – of poul henningsen wasn’t my initial motivation to buy the house, but coincidentally I’ve been collecting his lamps for quite some time, so you’ll find them around the house.‘ says the owner. 

 

 

 

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18Feb 2018


Michael Reynolds to Build Sustainable Public School in Argentina

Michael Reynolds to Build Sustainable Public School in Argentina, The sustainable school built by Michael Reynolds in Uruguay. Image via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma
The sustainable school built by Michael Reynolds in Uruguay. Image via Earthship Biotecture / Tagma

After a successful project in Uruguay—the first in Latin America—it’s now Argentina’s turn to build its first sustainable public school. The design will use the recycled materials of “garbage warrior” Michael Reynolds, the founder of Earthship Biotecture, and will be constructed as part of the program “A Sustainable School” in the unique biosphere of Mar Chiquita, in the Province of Buenos Aires, from March 1 to 28.

Read on for more information about the new project.

A Sustainable School is an initiative from the Uruguayan non-profit organization Tagma, in partnership with Earthship Biotecture, that aims to build a sustainable public school in every country in Latin America to create a network of symbolic examples in the region. In this case the Municipality of Mar Chiquita, in the southeast of the province of Buenos Aires, achieved the necessary points to develop this project successfully.

The sustainable school will be approximately 300 square meters and will provide a space to teach the 7 principles of sustainability on which the building will be built: the use of recycled materials; treatment of gray and black water; thermal conditioning; application of renewable energy sources; collection and purification of rainwater; organic food production, and the human factor. In addition, outside of school hours, the school will become a community center that will strengthen local ties around education and sustainability.

The construction of the school will also include an educational component from March 1 to 28, when the Earthship Academy will be present, in which around 100 participants will partake in constructing the building together with Earthship Biotecture and Tagma, while also being able to learn everything about the construction method developed by Reynolds in theoretical and practical classes.

If you are interested in the project, check out possible ways to participate and collaborate here.

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18Feb 2018


With Modernism Week in full flow, what better time to release a new tome that celebrates the desert haven of Palm Springs and its architectural allure. Design and architectural photographer Tim Street-Porter has previously contributed to many architectural volumes including L.A. Modern, Casa Mexicana, The Los Angeles House, Tropical Houses, and now he is honouring the mid-century marvels of Palm Springs.

Street-Porter takes us on a tour of the hotbed of designs in the Coachella Valley in Palm Springs: A Modernist Paradise, offering up a gleaming catalogue of architectural jewels, from the landmark Tramway Gas Station (also know as the Palm Springs Visitors Centre) by Albert Frey and Robson C Chambers, to William F Cody’s minimalist glass house.

Photography inside Palm Springs: A Modernist Paradise by Tim Street-Porter

But Street-Porter doesn’t just chart the structure of these mid-century marvels, he peeks inside some of the masterpieces displaying details such as John Lautner’s Elrod House where he captures the concrete and stone canopy and its intriguing shapes. Plus the weekend home of Hollywood-based designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard, who renamed his 1960s James McNaughton-designed house Villa Grigio, after his favourite poolside drink. Its at these points when furniture gets its moment in the sun too showing how Palm Springs isn’t just about outdoor Slim Aaron’s style scenes, but also awash with art and contemporary design collectors too.

His appreciation extends to the the desert surrounds of the resort, ensuring succulents, sandy scapes, and azure pools and sky are part of the canvas. Elsewhere sunlight and shadows play a key role in giving the images further character and added depth alongside the 20th-century buildings, showcasing the complete modernist paradise in all its glory.

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